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Xinhua world news summary at 0100 GMT, July 10

xinhua world news summary at 0100 gmt july 10
the africa news

WASHINGTON — The confirmed death toll in the partial collapse of a 12-story residential building in Surfside, southeastern U.S. state Florida, has risen to 78 after the remains of 14 more victims were found overnight in the rubble, authorities said on Friday.

There are 62 people who remain unaccounted for, and 200 accounted for, according to Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava. (U.S.-Building collapse)

– – – –

NEW DELHI — Local health ministry officials in the southern Indian state of Kerala Friday said 14 cases of Zika virus have been detected in the state.

Following the detection of cases, authorities have sounded an alert in the state. (India-Zika-Virus)

– – – –

VALLETTA — As from July 14, Malta will restrict entry to travelers with a recognized vaccination certificate in an effort to counter a spike in new COVID-19 cases, Health Minister Chris Fearne said here on Friday.

Moreover, the country will once again close its English language teaching schools after most of the new cases were students who traveled to Malta to learn English, Fearne said at a press conference. (Malta-Health)

– – – –

ADDIS ABABA — The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Africa reached 5,827,269 as of Friday afternoon, the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC) said.

The Africa CDC, the specialized healthcare agency of the 55-member African Union, said the death toll from the pandemic stands at 149,635 while 5,082,564 patients across the continent have recovered from the disease. (Africa CDC-COVID-19 Cases-Number)

Source: DreamAfrica LIVE (A DreamGalaxy Trusted Brand)

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[edm-announce] CFP: RL4ED – EDM’21 Workshop on Reinforcement Learning for Education

edm announce cfp rl4ed edm21 workshop on reinforcement learning for education
  • From: Stephen Fancsali <sfancsali@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: edm-announce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 12 May 2021 13:09:15 -0400

[on behalf of Adish Singla]

==================================

***Call for Papers***

Workshop on Reinforcement Learning for Education (RL4ED)
at the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2021)
https://rl4ed.org/edm2021/

Workshop Date: 29 June 2021
Paper Submission Deadline: 31 May 2021, 5:00:00 PM PST
Author Notification: 10 June 2021, 5:00:00 PM PST

==================================

***Overview***

This workshop aims to bring together researchers and practitioners
interested in the broad areas of reinforcement learning (RL) and
education (ED). The workshop will focus on two thrusts:

(1) Exploring how we can leverage recent advances in RL methods to
improve the state-of-the art technology for ED.

(2) Identifying unique challenges in ED that are beyond the current
methodology, but can help nurture technical innovations and next
breakthroughs in RL.

==================================

***Topics of Interest***

Topics of interests in the workshop include (but are not limited to)
the following:

* Survey papers summarizing recent advances in RL with applicability to ED.
* Developing toolkits, datasets, and challenges for applying RL methods to ED.
* Using RL for online evaluation and A/B testing of different
intervention strategies in ED.
* Novel applications of RL for ED problem settings.
* Using pedagogical theories to narrow the policy space of RL methods.
* Using RL methodology as a computational model of students in
open-ended domains.
* Developing novel offline RL methods that can efficiently leverage
historical student data.
* Combining statistical power of RL with symbolic reasoning to ensure
the robustness for ED.

==================================

***Submissions***

We solicit submissions of two types:

* Research track papers reporting the results of ongoing or new
research, which have not been published before. In particular, we
encourage papers covering late-breaking results and work-in-progress
research. Submissions should follow the EDM’21 format and are
encouraged to be up to four pages, excluding references and
appendices. Papers submitted for review do not need to be anonymized.
There will be no official proceedings, but the accepted papers will be
made available on the workshop website. Accepted papers will be either
presented as a talk or poster.

* Encore track papers that have been recently published, or accepted
for publication in a conference or journal. For this track, authors
only need to submit the Title and Abstract of their paper to the
submission site, and no PDF needs to be uploaded. At the end of the
Abstract, authors should clearly state the venue where the paper was
previously published and provide a URL link to access the PDF of the
paper online. Accepted papers will be presented as a poster. This is a
unique opportunity for the researchers to further broaden the
dissemination and impact of their important work.

Submission site: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=rl4ededm21

==================================

***Organizers***

* Neil T. Heffernan. Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, USA).
* Goran Radanovic. Max Planck Institute for Software Systems
(Saarbrucken, Germany).
* Anna N. Rafferty. Carleton College (Northfield, USA).
* Adish Singla. Max Planck Institute for Software Systems
(Saarbrucken, Germany).

==================================

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Covid shows why Africa’s reliance on outsiders for health is a problem 

covid shows why africas reliance on outsiders for health is a problem

Source: Covid shows why Africa’s reliance on outsiders for health is a problem – The Zimbabwe Independent

covid cells

BY FRANCISCA MUTAPI

The Covid-19 pandemic has reinforced several truths about the detrimental effects of Africa being over reliant on western and international stakeholders to solve its health challenges and using western solutions to Africa’s health problems.

The continent has suffered heavily from the global Covid-19 supply chain crisis. Competitive procurement by governments with deeper pockets has hiked prices of vaccines, while national export controls on essential commodities and raw materials have blocked access. These effects were recently highlighted by the African Union special envoy, Strive Masiyiwa.

This is a manifestation of a much larger systemic problem. African countries rely too heavily on western funding, products and approaches within their health systems.

This includes preventative and diagnostic measures developed for western societies and cultures, as well as interventions developed and optimised in the west.

One example is the international criteria for the autoimmune disease lupus. My colleagues and I recently showed that these were set using predominantly white patients and did not capture the unique characteristics of the disease in black Africans. Another problem is that relying on donor funding means that the funder ultimately determines the health priorities. This is one reason why many programmes in Africa focus on a single disease such as HIV. This approach allows impact evaluating and accountability. But it leads to health workers and services specialised in managing a single disease.

African countries need integrated health systems in which priorities and services are decided on, led and owned locally. This is the approach being advocated for by the World Health Organisation for neglected tropical diseases.

Country leadership and ownership of health systems will only come if African governments step up to the plate; and if there’s private investment. Most African countries have pledged to set a target of allocating at least 15% of their annual budget to improve their health sector. None has achieved this. With the additional Covid-19 damage to health services in 90% of African countries, the need to prioritise health in government budget allocations has never been more urgent.

Unique health needs

The Covid-19 pandemic has illustrated how African countries have unique health needs. The continent’s population is younger, it has more infectious diseases, a larger rural population, uses both western and traditional medicine, and has cultural practices that affect disease risk.

African countries need a systemic approach targeting training, research, infrastructure, implementation and awareness programmes through the following three ways.

First, countries need to invest in training and retaining health personnel and services appropriate for their needs. Europe has about 40 doctors and 75 nurses per 10 000 people.

Africa has about five doctors and 10 nurses per 10 000 people. This has meant that countries cannot rely on clinical staff for universal health coverage such as Covid-19 testing and screening.

Community health workers have become a critical part of the African health system delivering universal health coverage. They have played an important role in the Covid-19 pandemic. For example, South Africa drew on its community-orientated primary care staffed by community health workers for disease surveillance and testing.

They should be trained and rewarded appropriately to deliver other forms of interventions such as treatments for neglected tropical diseases and maternal health services. Second, invest in and promote world-class research on African health interventions including herbal medicines and traditional healers to solve African health problems. In Zimbabwe a novel way of providing mental health therapy is a good case in point.

The country only has 17 registered psychiatrists for a population of 15 million people. A team drew on the African tradition of talking therapy that can be delivered by community health workers as an intervention for mental illness. This therapy, formalised through the Friendship Bench, was used to deliver therapy to 30 000 people in 2017.

One reason the Friendship Bench has been successful is that its effectiveness has been evaluated in clinical trials.

A significant amount of research has been conducted on herbal medicines to identify active ingredients and mechanisms of action. But most have not undergone international standard clinical trials. As a result they are treated with suspicion and inferiority. This is a gap that needs to be filled.

But these trials should be conducted in Africa. This is because genetic, comorbidity and cultural disease risk factors in Africans differ from elsewhere. For example, Africans are more likely to carry concurrent infectious diseases such as parasitic worms and malaria, possibly with HIV as an underlying condition. An example of different practices is that many women still prefer to deliver their babies with the help of traditional birth attendants.

In addition, the African Union should insist that drug and vaccine trials carried out in Africa meet international standards to avoid repeating historical ethical concerns. This will build trust, which underlies willingness to participate in trials.

The African Union should also ensure Africans receive the full benefit from clinical trials conducted on the continent by negotiating access to the interventions before granting trial permissions.

Third, countries must create a permissive environment to support research and innovation.

This includes intellectual property and medicines controls policies and competitive markets. Researchers in Africa have indicated several barriers to running clinical trials including human capacity, delays in regulatory and ethical reviews, complex logistical and financial systems, bureaucracy and opaque procedures.

The continent already has frameworks for health innovations and most countries have medicines control authorities. These should now be harmonised at continental level through the Africa Medicines Agency to facilitate sharing of best practices and transparency.

The Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plan for Africa provides a vehicle for local pharmaceutical production, while the African Continental Free Trade Area agreement aims to make African industries more competitive on the global stage. Their implementation needs to be accelerated.

It is clear that as long as African countries don’t produce the health personnel and products Africa’s health system needs, they will be at the back of the global queue for resources produced abroad. — theconversation

Mutapi is professor in Global Health Infection and Immunity. and co-director of the Global Health Academy, University of Edinburgh

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Burkina Faso: ACLED Regional Overview – Africa (26 June – 2 July 2021)

burkina faso acled regional overview africa 26 june 2 july 2021
1574370 acleddata.com Regional%20Overview%20Africa26%20June 2%20July%202021

A separate, weekly discussion of the ongoing conflict in Mozambique and Ethiopia can be found in the Cabo Ligado and Ethiopia Peace Observatory projects, respectively.

Last week in Africa, an alliance was formed between Boko Haram and ISWAP militants in Nigeria; Islamist militants continued their attacks in Central Sahel and Somalia; and anti-government demonstrations erupted in Sudan and eSwatini.

In Nigeria, several Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP) Lake Chad faction fighters reunited in a video and jointly pledged allegiance to Aba Ibrahim Al-Hashimiyil AlKhuraishi (Premium Times, 26 June 2021). Meanwhile, Nigerian military forces clashed with and conducted airstrikes against Boko Haram and ISWAP Lake Chad faction camps in Borno state with several fatalities reported at the Forward Operational Base in the Bama local government area. Security forces also launched strikes targeting areas suspected of housing top members of the Indigenous Peoples of Biafra (IPOB) in the Illah area in Delta state. Elsewhere, violence against civilians perpetrated by communal militia continued, triggering deadly clashes with Nigerian military forces particularly in the state of Zamfara.

In Burkina Faso, suspected Jama’at Nusrat al-Islam wal-Muslimin (JNIM) militants continued widespread violence against civilians, including several instances of attacks and abductions, most notably in the East region. Meanwhile, the Burkinabe military forces conducted airstrikes and ground operations targeting presumed JNIM fighters in the Central North and Sahel regions. Suspected JNIM-affiliated Katiba Macina militants were particularly active in the Mopti region of Mali, carrying out a deadly attack against Dan Na Ambassagou militiamen and market goers escorted by the militia near Petaka.

In Niger, suspected ISWAP Greater Sahara faction fighters carried out several deadly attacks against civilians in the Tillaberi Region. Elsewhere, ISWAP Lake Chad faction militants attacked a convoy consisting of a communal transport bus and the motorcade of the President of the Supreme Court of Diffa near the village of Gagamari in the Diffa region, followed by deadly clashes with Nigerien military forces in the village of Boula Adam. ISWAP also claimed to have launched rockets targeting the airport in the town of Diffa. The attacks occurred in the midst of President Mohamed Bazoum’s visit to the Diffa Region (ActuNiger, 1 July 2021).

In Somalia, Al Shabaab militants continued their attacks against civilians, and Somali and international forces. In the Middle Juba and Bay regions, several people accused of spying for British and American intelligence agencies were killed by Al Shabaab firing squads. Further, a suicide bomb attack perpetrated by Al Shabaab in Shibis district of Mogadishu killed at least 11 people. Elsewhere, clashes erupted between Somali military forces and Al Shabaab fighters following a suicide vehicle-borne IED attack against a government security forces base in Wisil village in the Muduq region, leaving dozens of civilians and soldiers dead. Attacks against Ethiopian and African Union Mission in Somali (AMISOM) troops were also reported in different regions of the country.

In the Central African Republic, Wagner group mercenaries carried out further attacks against civilians, including abduction and sexual violence. Moreover, they kidnapped the regional commander of national military forces in Ndele in the Bamingui-Bangoran prefecture. Meanwhile, they continued their operations alongside military forces against Union for Peace in the Central African Republic (UPC) militants under the Coalition of Patriots for Change (CPC) alliance.

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, deadly clashes between the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) and the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) continued in Ituri and North Kivu provinces, leaving dozens of fatalities and permitting the FARDC to regain control of several areas in the Irumu region of Ituri province.

In Burundi, an attack on civilians travelling in the Rutegama commune of Muramvya province by an unidentified armed group resulted in more than a dozen fatalities. Since the attack, several suspects affiliated to the National Congress for Liberation (CNL) and Union for National Progress (UPRONA), as well as former military forces and Rwandan nationals have been arrested.

Finally, mass anti-government demonstrations erupted in Sudan and eSwatini. In Sudan, demonstrators voiced opposition to austerity measures and in particular the removal of the fuel subsidy, with some demonstrators calling for the removal of the transitional government. In Khartoum, clashes between police and demonstrators wounded dozens, while a police officer was killed in Gedaref. In eSwatini, demonstrators called for democratic reforms in the country and denounced police brutality. During the week, a curfew was imposed and security forces were deployed across all four regions of the country (Africanews, 30 June 2021). Security forces’ intervention left more than a dozen of demonstrators dead.

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Africanews Exclusive: Bold action to reshape Africa-Europe relations [Interview]

africanews exclusive bold action to reshape africa europe relations interview
africanews exclusive bold action to reshape africa europe relations interview 2africanews exclusive bold action to reshape africa europe relations interview 2

The Africa-Europe Foundation is looking to take steps in advocating for bold ideas and actions to reshape Africa and Europe’s common future together.

The Foundation which was launched in December last year, among others, seeks to unlock new opportunities to transform relations between the two continents.

Africanews had an exclusive conversation with the two Honorary presidents of the Africa-Europe Foundation.

Africanews’ Ignatius Annor speaks to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former President of Liberia and Nobel Laureate from the Liberian capital, Monrovia. Mary Robinson is first woman President of Ireland and Chair of the Elders. She’s based in Dublin.

_You can watch the full interview in the video player above.
_

Ignatius Annor: Ambition is theme for the first Africa-Europe forum. That ambition includes accelerating social, economic and political change. Liberian activists have been making a case for a strong political will to stem systemic corruption. Critics point to lip service. How is the Foundation positioning itself to address issues like these?

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf: ‘’Liberia has a strong relationship. With European countries as to all of the African countries. And in the partnership relationship with those countries, it is clear that transparency and accountability is a requirement to ensure that activities supported and financed through this bilateral relationship is observed. But I’m glad that the Africa-Europe Foundation provides another opportunity to be able to stress the importance of fighting corruption. And we can use the Ibrahim Index of African governance, that tends to track the progress and the level of constraints of governance in all of the countries. ‘’

Ignatius Annor: Leaders on the continent are shifting to a more progressive partnership with global powers. Will the Africa-Europe Foundation provide a win-win scenario?

Mary Robinson: ‘’There is a need for a much more mature, equal partnership. And, you know, both continents are linked closely to each other and have never worked through a really in-depth partnership. Now at the forum. And that’s just taken place, we had very key leaders like Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, taking part in the whole health session because she knows, and has spoken openly about the importance for African countries of helping them to have the fiscal space for a recovery. She has the special drawing rights. She’s urging countries to, you know, recognize that this isn’t just a health issue. It’s an economic issue. It’s a crisis issue. It’s an inequality issue.’’

Ignatius Annor: A staggering 33 million people face acute food insecurity in Africa, world vision says. How will the Africa-Europe agri-food partnership help to address this?

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf: ‘’There is an agriculture subgroup in the foundation that will, of course, be focusing on how we can, as the foundation can again grow more attention to this advocacy role, to being able to prioritize agriculture in our countries, focusing on the areas of most need. Invest best informal sector where most of agriculture activity takes place amongst women, women who have less than full access to the factors of production as relates to agriculture.’’

Ignatius Annor: The African Union and Africa CDC are concerned that vaccines donated to many African countries through COVAX are not recognized by EU travel certificate. You have an Africa-Europe Health Alliance on your agenda for the forum. Does this not undermine vaccine equality?

Mary Robinson: ‘’You know, our high level group, which Ellen and I are both on at the Africa Europe Foundation, shortly after the launch of the foundation, took the decision to make vaccine equity the subject of its first call to action. And the manifesto was co-signed by leading personalities across Africa and Europe. And is a basis for us, focusing on the political and policy action required. So if it is felt that the move to have this European passport, which still isn’t fully clear if it becomes in any way a barrier, the Africa Europe Foundation will be on the case.’’

Ignatius Annor: In the post pandemic recovery, a key focus will be on redefining the role of cities as two-thirds of the global population are projected to live in cities by 2050. How will your partnership lead to improved well-being for urban dwellers?

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf: ‘’A key area for largely concentrated urban areas is energy. I have been meeting the Women Leaders Network, have been having sessions on energy, and we’re talking about the clean cooking solution, something in which focus is brought to bear on the types of cooking, the types of methods for having energy, for cooking that needs to change, to move away from fossil fuels types of organizations to ensure that that we have solutions that take us away from coal, which is the one that is largely used in many of our communities, even in urban communities in Africa in countries.’’

Ignatius Annor: Finally, let me end with you Ma’am Robinson, what does the Foundation hope to achieve in the next five years for Africa and Europe?

Mary Robinson: ‘’Whether it’s for health, the climate crisis or other issues, the moment is now and we urgently need bold ideas and action to reshape Africa’s and Europe’s common future together. And these need to be inclusive. They need to be transgenerational. I’m a great believer in the inter-generational dialogue and sustainable way to address today’s environmental, economic, social, health and technological challenges. And we’re seeing the potential for a new chapter in Africa-Europe relations at the more political level helped a lot by this platform of platforms that can reach out and link open up and build more trust and face tough issues, honestly.’’

africanews exclusive bold action to reshape africa europe relations interview

africanews exclusive bold action to reshape africa europe relations interviewSource: Africanews

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Remarks by Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield at a UN Security Council Briefing on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

remarks by ambassador linda thomas greenfield at a un security council briefing on the grand ethiopian renaissance dam
remarks by ambassador linda thom

Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield
U.S. Representative to the United Nations
New York, New York
July 8, 2021

[embedded content]

AS DELIVERED

Thank you, Mr. President. And let me start by thanking you the briefers, Special Envoy Onanga Anyanga, Executive Director Andersen, and the DRC representative on behalf of Chairman Tshisekedi, for the information that you shared with us today. I would also like to welcome the participation of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs from Egypt and Sudan and the Minister of Water from Ethiopia.

Mr. President, the Horn of Africa is at an inflection point. Decisions in the weeks and months ahead will have significant, long-term implications for the people of the region. The United States is committed to addressing the interlinked regional crises and to supporting a prosperous and stable Horn of Africa. So, we stand ready to support collaborative and constructive efforts by Ethiopia, Egypt, and Sudan to resolve the issues over the GERD.


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Read Aloud:   Ethiopia to Yemen – The Most Dangerous Journey on Earth (BBC)

We understand that the Nile waters and how these waters are used are important to all three of these countries. And we believe this is an issue that can be reconciled. A balanced and equitable solution to the filling and operation of the GERD can be reached with political commitment from all parties. Egypt and Sudan’s concerns over water security and the safety and operation of the dam can be reconciled with Ethiopia’s development needs.

This begins with the resumption of productive, substantive negotiations. Those negotiations should be held under the leadership of the African Union and should recommence with urgency. This process should use the 2015 Declaration of Principles signed by the parties and the July 2020 statement by the AU Bureau as foundational references.

We believe that the African Union is the most appropriate venue to address this dispute, and the United States is committed to providing political and technical support to facilitate a successful outcome. We urge the African Union and the parties to use the expertise and support of the three official observers – South Africa, the European Union, and the United States – as well as the United Nations and other partners to help achieve a positive outcome.


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Read Aloud:   Ethiopian Workers Are Forced to Return Home, Some With Coronavirus

We also urge representatives of Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt to continue to discuss with our government the full range of possible means to de-escalate tensions, and to demonstrate flexibility in your approach to resolving this matter peacefully. We call on all parties to refrain from making any statements or taking any actions that might jeopardize the negotiation process and to commit themselves to a negotiated solution that is acceptable to everyone. Reaching a solution on the GERD would pave the way for additional cooperation on water resources, regional development, and economic integration.

We reaffirm our commitment to work with Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan, as well as our allies and partners, to ensure that the African Union-led negotiations resume with urgency and move toward productive, substantive, and constructive ends.

Thank you, Mr. President.

###

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Bénin : la Banque africaine de développement renforce les capacités des unités de gestion de projets sur la sauvegarde environnementale et sociale

Le Département de la conformité et des sauvegardes environnementale et sociale de la Banque africaine de développement, en collaboration avec le Bureau de représentation de la Banque au Bénin et la Caisse autonome d’amortissement (CAA), a organisé, du 29 juin au 1er juillet derniers, un atelier de renforcement des capacités des membres des unités de gestion de projets (UGP) sur la mise en œuvre et le suivi des instruments de sauvegarde environnementale et sociale.

L’objectif était de renforcer les compétences des UGP sur la mise en œuvre adéquate des documents de sauvegarde environnementale et sociale, et les sensibiliser à anticiper tout risque d’ordre environnemental et social. Ces documents sont publiés lors de la préparation des projets financés par la Banque africaine de développement.

Plus d’une centaine de participants représentant la Caisse autonome d’amortissement, l’Agence béninoise pour l’environnement ainsi que les coordonnateurs, experts en sauvegardes environnementales et sociales, spécialistes en suivi-évaluation, experts en passation des marchés et responsables financiers des UGP et responsables de la Banque, ont participé à cet atelier tenu en visioconférence.

Dr Issa Maman-Sani, directeur du Département de la conformité et des sauvegardes environnementale et sociale à la Banque africaine de développement a relevé que l’atelier était un cadre d’échanges et de partage d’expérience entre les participants.

Pour le représentant de la Banque africaine de développement au Bénin, Dr John Andrianarisata, les enseignements pertinents issus des échanges permettront aux participants de consolider davantage leurs connaissances sur les risques d’ordre environnemental et social.

Vincent Simoukoua, directeur général adjoint de la CAA, a remercié la Banque africaine de développement pour son appui constant en matière de renforcement de capacités, depuis l’ouverture de son bureau au Bénin en 2017.

La session technique de l’atelier portait sur quatre modules et quatorze thématiques, dont les exigences des accords de financement, les  responsabilités du pays bénéficiaire pendant la mise en œuvre du projet, le mécanisme de gestion des plaintes et l’engagement des acteurs pendant la phase opérationnelle du projet. D’autres thématiques liées à la législation et aux procédures nationales en matière d’évaluation environnementale et de protection sociale ainsi qu’aux mécanismes de gestion des plaintes ont également été présentées.

Au terme de l’atelier, le représentant de la Banque au Bénin a salué l’assiduité des participants durant cette formation et réitéré la volonté de la Banque africaine de développement d’assurer un suivi de proximité des projets afin d’impulser, avec plus d’efficacité, la mise en œuvre des instruments de sauvegarde environnementale et sociale. Dr Aimée Bella-Corbin, coordonnatrice environnementale et sociale pour la région Afrique de l’Ouest à la Banque africaine de développement, s’est engagée à intégrer les contenus complémentaires suggérés par les participants dans le programme de renforcement des capacités du Département de la conformité et des sauvegardes environnementale et sociale de la Banque.

Enfin, Arsène Dansou, directeur général de la CAA, a exprimé toute sa gratitude à la Banque africaine de développement pour son engagement au service du développement socio-économique du Bénin. Il a salué la pertinence et la qualité des échanges qui permettront, selon lui, d’améliorer l’exécution du portefeuille de la Banque au Bénin.

Source: AfDB (A DreamGalaxy Trusted Brand)

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News24.com | Seven UN peacekeepers injured in Mali blast

news24 com seven un peacekeepers injured in mali blast
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Seven UN peacekeepers were injured Friday when their vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in central Mali, the United Nations peacekeeping mission announced.

The device exploded beneath the vehicle which was travelling near Diallo, in the central Mopti region, MINUSMA, the UN peacekeeping mission, tweeted.

The nationality of those injured wasn’t given.

MINUSMA head El-Ghassim Wane firmly condemned “these cowardly acts which are intended to disrupt the course of our operations”.

Jihadist fighters use IEDs against national and international forces in Mali. The victims are often civilians.

ALSO READ | Mali suspended from African Union after second coup in nine months

Since 2012, separatist and jihadist rebellions in northern Mali have plunged the country into constant conflict that has left thousands of civilians and fighters dead, despite international help.

Separatists signed a peace agreement in 2015, but groups linked to Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State continue to oppose the government, against a background of inter-ethnic rivalry and various types of border smuggling.

The violence has spread to nearby Burkina Faso and Niger in the Sahel region.

UN peacekeepers are often attacked as are French forces in the area.

On Friday President Emmanuel Macron said France would start closing military bases in northern Mali by year-end, as the jihadist threat in the Sahel begins to shift south and expose more countries in the region to Islamist attacks.

Source: DreamAfrica LIVE (A DreamGalaxy Trusted Brand)

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Seven UN peacekeepers injured in Mali blast

seven un peacekeepers injured in mali blast
n241625856095

Seven UN peacekeepers were injured Friday when their vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in central Mali, the United Nations peacekeeping mission announced.

The device exploded beneath the vehicle which was travelling near Diallo, in the central Mopti region, MINUSMA, the UN peacekeeping mission, tweeted.

The nationality of those injured wasn’t given.

MINUSMA head El-Ghassim Wane firmly condemned “these cowardly acts which are intended to disrupt the course of our operations”.

Jihadist fighters use IEDs against national and international forces in Mali. The victims are often civilians.

ALSO READ | Mali suspended from African Union after second coup in nine months

Since 2012, separatist and jihadist rebellions in northern Mali have plunged the country into constant conflict that has left thousands of civilians and fighters dead, despite international help.

Separatists signed a peace agreement in 2015, but groups linked to Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State continue to oppose the government, against a background of inter-ethnic rivalry and various types of border smuggling.

The violence has spread to nearby Burkina Faso and Niger in the Sahel region.

UN peacekeepers are often attacked as are French forces in the area.

On Friday President Emmanuel Macron said France would start closing military bases in northern Mali by year-end, as the jihadist threat in the Sahel begins to shift south and expose more countries in the region to Islamist attacks.

Source: News24

Source: DreamAfrica LIVE (A DreamGalaxy Trusted Brand)

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G5 Sahel : la Banque africaine de développement et le HCR appuient le plan de riposte sanitaire du Tchad contre la pandémie de Covid-19

g5 sahel la banque africaine de developpement et le hcr appuient le plan de riposte sanitaire du tchad contre la pandemie de covid 19
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La Banque africaine de développement et le Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) au Tchad ont remis, le 30 juin dernier, au gouvernement tchadien des équipements médicaux et du matériel de protection destinés aux structures impliquées dans la lutte contre la pandémie de Covid-19.

Ce don d’une valeur de près de 2,85 millions de dollars américains, composé de divers matériels (ventilateurs intensifs portables, tensiomètres pour adultes et pour enfants, stéthoscopes, thermomètres infrarouge et thermomètres électroniques, échographes numériques, protecteurs faciaux, gants d’examen, lits avec relève buste, ventilateurs soins intensifs, etc.) s’inscrit dans le cadre de l’exécution du Projet d’appui en faveur des pays membres du G5 Sahel face à la pandémie.

Le secrétaire d’État à la Santé et à la Solidarité nationale du Tchad, Dr Djiddi Ali Sougoudi, a reçu le don des mains du représentant de la Banque africaine de développement au Tchad, Ali Lamine Zeine, et de la représentante adjointe chargée de protection au HCR, Mme Iris Blom.

« Ce premier lot d’équipements médicaux et de matériels de protection contre le Covid-19 vient à point nommé puisque, selon les dernières nouvelles, la pandémie continue de faire des victimes en Afrique et dans le monde. Notre pays ne fait pas exception même si les cas enregistrés par nos services sont en baisse ces derniers jours », a déclaré Djiddi Ali Sougoudi.

Mme Iris Blom a remercié la Banque africaine de développement pour ce don. Elle a souligné que l’objectif de ce projet était de renforcer le système de santé des pays membres du G5 Sahel, de réduire et stopper la propagation du virus, et d’appuyer non seulement la résilience des communautés vulnérables mais aussi les déplacées internes, les réfugiés et leurs communautés d’accueil.

« Conformément à l’un de ses cinq objectifs stratégiques, notamment améliorer les conditions de vie des populations africaines, la Banque africaine de développement est très engagée et enthousiaste à l’idée de contribuer activement à la bonne santé des populations du continent », a déclaré Ali Lamine Zeine, responsable pays de la Banque au Tchad.

Le Projet d’appui en faveur des pays membres du G5 Sahel pour la lutte contre la pandémie de Covid-19, coordonné par le Secrétariat exécutif du G5 Sahel, est financé par la Banque africaine de développement à hauteur de vingt millions de dollars. Il est mis en œuvre par le HCR, en collaboration avec les gouvernements des pays membres du G5 Sahel : Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritanie, Niger et Tchad. Ce financement est destiné à renforcer leur capacité de réponse et à moderniser leurs systèmes de surveillance épidémiologique. Le projet soutient également la mise en œuvre de mesures nationales de protection sociale en faveur des réfugiés et de leurs communautés d’accueil. Il contribue enfin à appuyer les systèmes alimentaires et nutritionnels.

« Ce projet vise à consolider les capacités d’exécution et de coordination du Secrétariat exécutif du G5 Sahel et à assurer des formations sur la biosécurité et la gestion des déchets biomédicaux dans les cinq pays bénéficiaires », a précisé M. Zeine.

Dr Abderahim Younous Ali, secrétaire d’État auprès du ministre de l’Économie, de la Planification du développement et de la Coopération internationale du Tchad, également président du Conseil des ministres du G5 Sahel, a souligné que ce projet était une réponse idoine non seulement à la lutte contre la pandémie mais aussi pour réduire l’impact socio-économique du Covid-19 dans les cinq pays bénéficiaires du Sahel. Il a ajouté que ce projet permettrait également de renforcer les capacités opérationnelles du secrétariat exécutif du G5 Sahel et ses cinq comités nationaux de coordination.

Source: AfDB (A DreamGalaxy Trusted Brand)