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Dear Tired Mom of Gifted Kids

dear tired mom of gifted kids

It’s been a long day already, and you haven’t even taken your first sip of coffee. You didn’t get to bed until well after midnight because the oldest couldn’t shut his mind down and wanted, no needed, to talk about every single swirling thought he’d ever had.

Dear Tired Mama of Gifted Kids

At four a.m. you were violently shaken awake by the six year old who just needed to hear you say, yet again, that it was highly unlikely that the sun would explode whilst she slept. And what scientific proof you had to back up your stance.

You finally got her settled again, snuggled next to your slumbering husband when the toddler started crying. He just needed to cuddle, and so in desperation you brought him into bed with you praying that this way you might both get some sleep.

You did.

For a few hours.

And then you awoke to a crash in the kitchen at 7:30ish.

Your sweet eight year old decided to make you coffee, and dropped the canister, then tripped over the chair she’d used to get the coffee out of the cupboard in the first place. And you looked at the table and saw that she’d pulled dough out of the fridge and was rolling it out for biscuits – and had spread flour everywhere.

Dear Tired Mama of Gifted Kids

Bleary-eyed, you finished making the coffee, and worked together with your daughter to clean up the mess, and soothed her sobs. Her plan had been to surprise you with a complete breakfast, ready to go, as soon as you woke up. And she’d hoped to be halfway through her independent school work before that.

But things often don’t look like the perfect picture in her head, and she just can’t handle that when perfectionism rears its ugly head.

So, for sanity’s sake, you are now sitting on the couch, cradling your coffee in your cupped hands, breathing in the vanilla flavored creamer and the peppermint essential oil you dropped in, hoping it would clear the cobwebs from your cluttered mind – and the television is on with Leap singing the alphabet to your littlest.

Dear Tired Mama of Gifted Kids

And you’re gearing up for the chaos of the day.

Homeschooling – no, parenting – gifted kids is not for the weak. There’s the anxiety. And the asynchrony. And the overexcitabilities. And the intensity. And the perfectionism. You often think that whomever came up with the term gifted to describe children like yours, may have used the word gift to remind themselves that children were a blessing.

Because oftentimes giftedness is not.

Take heart, mama, it is worth it.

The late night theological discussions, the endless curiosity, the boundless energy, the constant noise… it’s all worth it.

But, because the traditional parenting tips don’t typically work with gifted and intense children, you often feel alone and like you’re failing.

Miserably.

Dear Tired Mama of Gifted Kids

Dear Tired Mom of Gifted Kids

Here’s the thing, mama of gifted and intense kiddos… you’re not failing. At all. There are other moms out there who are experiencing the same failures, the same exhaustion, the same endless unanswerable questions from pint-sized brains that run laps around your own.

And the supermom myth… well it’s just a myth. You can’t do it all, and you certainly can’t do it alone.

Moms of gifted kids need help – and they need to be okay asking for it.

Help can be a conversation in a support group for parents of gifted children. Something simple to remind you that you’re not alone, your kids will be fine, and you’ll make it through this adventure of parenting. If you’re looking for a fantastic and supportive community full of parents who get you, I’d love to have you join us in The Learner’s Lab

the learners lab for gifted kids

Help is going out for coffee with a friend – just to be a normal woman for an evening. It’s getting together with with a small group of moms and their kids, and being okay with whatever means fun for your kiddo, even if that’s reading under a tree while the other kids run around on the playground.

It’s even pulling away from everyone for a few days or weeks to regroup and reconnect as a family. To sit at home and cuddle on the couch with one another.

Help is whatever YOU need most.

But, tired mama, the best thing you can do to help yourself through this journey of parenting misunderstood kiddos is to remember that you ARE a fantastic parent. You are exactly the mother designed for your kids. You’re perfect for them. Especially in your imperfection.

There’s no such thing as a perfect mama. Only one doing her best, learning and growing alongside her kiddos.

Sip that coffee, regroup, and rely on Netflix from time to time if you need to. But don’t doubt that you’re doing a wonderful job. You ARE a great mom.

I’m sitting here with my coffee, and thinking about you. Knowing that you’re out there helps me through my struggles too. We’re in this together, tired mama of gifted kids, and we can do this.

Thinking of you – and clinking my mug to yours… Be brave today. Smart kids are cool – and so are you. Carry on and know that help is a FB message or email away.

 

For more posts on parenting gifted kids, check out:

         

Dear Tired Mama of Gifted Kids

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5 Virtual Playdate Ideas to Keep Kids Entertained and Engaged While Home

5 virtual playdate ideas to keep kids entertained and engaged while home
HHM Five Virtual Playdate Ideas PIN

Are your kids going stir crazy at home? While people in some areas are beginning to be able to get out a little more, others are not. Or maybe you have a child (or yourself!) who has a medical condition that requires you to stay home and away from any potential danger of getting sick. Maybe you care for an elderly relative and can’t get out as much as you’d like. Or you could be in the middle of super cold, super hot, or even rainy weather that makes getting outside hard to do. There are lots of reasons why you and your children might be interested in virtual playdate ideas, so I’m sharing these 5 virtual playdate ideas with you today!

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Thankfully, Zoom and other video conferencing platforms have provided a way to stay connected to friends and family even if you can’t be together in-person. This means kids can still see and talk to their friends. No, it’s not exactly the same as getting together in real life, but it’s the next best thing!

5 Ways Kids Can Connect with Friends Through Video

1. Board Games

Board games have always been a popular option for gatherings–and for good reason! They’re appropriate for any group size and are enjoyed by almost everyone. Now, video conferencing has made it possible to play games with friends and family even when you’re not in the same location. Yahtzee, Farkle, Bingo, and Charades are a few games you can play over Zoom or Facetime that are cost-effective and fun for all ages.

There are actually lots of kinds of bingo games for kids! Click this link to see some of them. You’ll find bingo games for preschoolers, alphabet bingo, animal bingo, holiday-themed games, and even Spanish versions!

And, on Only Passionate Curiosity, you’ll find an article sharing a printable Boredom Busting Bingo game. This one is a little different because it is actually a bingo board that includes spaces for things like “learn about food chains” or “make up a dance” or “make papercrafts.” Then, in the information included in the article, you’ll find links to printables for helping your kids learn about food chains, templates and ideas for all kinds of papercrafts, etc. This is a fun and educational way to play bingo! 

2. Weekly Book Club

This one is exciting – especially for book lovers like me! An online book club is super simple to set up. You can coordinate with neighbors, friends, or other homeschool families to find kids who are interested in participating. 

Once you’ve got a group together, have the kids choose a book (maybe have them vote on two parent-approved options) and discuss the details – days/times of meetings, which video platform to use, how many chapters a week to read, discussion questions or free-flowing convo, etc. Putting a plan in place will ensure everyone is on the same page (yes, pun totally intended). 

Right now with everyone stuck at home, escaping to a new world – with your friends! – is a great way to feel less alone. 

3. “Show and Tell”

Yep, I said “show and tell.” Just like we did in elementary school all those years ago. Kids love showing off their stuff!

Just grab a group of friends with kids and set up an informal weekly chat. Maybe (to get everyone “warmed up” and ready to be on camera) start with circle time and let parents take turns leading songs and stories. Then, let the kids hop on camera to show the group their most prized possessions. Let each child have a turn giving a little background about his or her treasure, and then have a Q&A time for others in the group to ask questions about their treasured objects (or pets….kids love their furry – or scaly – critters!). You can keep it to one kid per week or let everyone have a short turn each time you meet – whatever works best for your group.

Bonus – this is a fantastic opportunity to help your kids build confidence when speaking in front of others!

4. Arts and Crafts

Arts and crafts are the perfect boredom buster for kids at home. Have them put on their creative hats and get together for a virtual “make and take” project each week with friends. You can find craft ideas online and have everyone gather their own supplies before each meeting.

Crafts can be chosen based on a class theme (sea creatures, fairy tales, dinosaurs, etc.). Or, kids can take turns each week picking a craft for the group to do together.

Our sister site, Only Passionate Curiosity, has some great arts & crafts ideas that are either inexpensive or free. You’ll also find educational printables, unit studies, worksheets, and other fun ideas!

Pro tip – designate a parent to send out a weekly supply list so everyone has time to gather what they need to participate. Be sure the list is sent out at least a week ahead of time! 

5. Social Club (Around a Central Topic)

This one is probably my favorite. I have a child that can talk for hours and hours and hours about Minecraft. I try to give him my full, undivided attention, but let’s be real, it’s hard. My eyes glaze over because I don’t understand most of what he’s saying.

If you can’t get out and physically be with friends right now, forming an online group chat with your child’s peers surrounding a topic of interest is a great solution. It gives them an opportunity to “geek out” over all the details of their interest/hobby that we, as parents, don’t always fully get. And the friendships formed by kids connecting in this way have the potential to last long beyond these online meetups. 

Kids can exchange letters, talk on parent-approved messaging apps, and/or continue to video chat (or see one another in-person, if local) once the social club has run its course and life has gotten a little more back to normal.

Bonus Ideas and Activities

We all know we tend to feel better when we do nice things for others. It just makes us feel good to help others feel good! So how about performing some random acts of kindness? You can do these together with your virtual group or on your own!

Some of these may not be do-able right now if they require that you leave the house and you’re not able to do that, but many of them are perfect for doing right at home! 30 Random Acts of Kindness for Kids includes some fun yet simple ideas for doing things to show your kids you care. (Yes, we do that every day by feeding them and keeping them alive! 🙂 But sometimes our kids enjoy an extra special reminder that we’re glad they belong to us!) If you and your children want to do some random acts of kindness for someone else, you’ll find great ideas in these articles: 50 Random Acts of Kindess  (some of which can be done from home) and 50 More Random Acts of Kindness (That Can Be Done from Home).

The Wrap Up

Life looks different for many of us right now. While we can’t do anything to change the events of the past year, we can try to find the bright side and make the most of our current circumstances. While get-togethers aren’t happening as much, video conferencing has made it possible to connect face-to-face. 

Which of these ideas do you think your kids will enjoy? Or do you have other ideas to share? Please let us know in the comments below!

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Poetry Study on The Crocodile by Lewis Carroll

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Unpoppable Bubble Recipe

Soap Carving Ideas and Information for Children

Soap Carving for Everyone!

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100 Hands-On Activities for Middle and High School

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A Collection of Easter Ideas and Activities

a collection of easter ideas and activities
HHM Collection of Easter Ideas and Activities PIN

Don’t you love finding new ways to celebrate holidays? We thought you would because we love it too! Here you’ll find a collection of ideas and activities we’ve gathered from our own sites and from some of our blogging friends. We truly do hope you are inspired to try one (or several!) of these activities and ideas!

HHM Collection of Easter Ideas and Activities

Whether you want to keep things simple, use what you already have on hand, or go all out and have a big celebration, we think you’ll find just what you’re looking for!

Games and Hands-on Activities

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Printable Easter Story Trivia Game

We hope this free printable Easter Story Trivia Game will help you keep the focus on Christ this Easter season!

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LEGO Tomb Activity for Easter

This LEGO Tomb Easter Activity will help you share the story of Christ’s resurrection with your kids in a hands-on way this Easter!

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Easter Egg Parachute Game

If you’re having an Easter party (or if you just have a lot of kids!), this is a fun game for young children.

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Easter Story LEGO Challenge

This Lego challenge is perfect for helping children illustrate (and remember) the Easter story.

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Paper Roll Bunny Craft for Kids

Looking for a simple, just-for-fun Easter craft for your family or a party? This is it!

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Make A Frederick’s Cross Using Blacksmith Secrets

These crosses are beautiful and are easier to make than you might think!

Dyeing Eggs and Easter Egg Activities

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Using shaving cream and food coloring to dye Easter eggs is fun and simple, and your eggs will be pastel beauties!

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Fizzing Rainbow Easter Eggs!!

This fun science experiment/activity is perfect for the Easter season.

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10 Fun Ways to Recycle Plastic Easter Eggs

If you’re like me, you hate throwing things away if they can be recycled or repurposed! This article shares 10 ways to use leftover plastic eggs in fun and educational ways.

ABCs and Math Activities

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Upper & Lowercase Easter Egg Match

If you like the number match activity above, we think you’ll love this upper and lowercase letter match too!

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Easter Egg Number Match

This is a super cute preschool math activity for children who are working on counting, matching, and recognizing numbers.

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Easter Egg Math

Use plastic Easter eggs to do these math activities with your little ones.

Fun with Food

sweet chicks easter snackSweet Chicks Easter Snack

This sweet Easter treat reminds us of new life, so it’s a perfect Easter or Palm Sunday treat for kids to make and eat!

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Dissolving Peeps Science Experiment

If you have Peeps for Easter (or leftover Peeps after Easter), use them to do this experiment! It’s super easy and inexpensive.

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Fun Jelly Bean Structure Activity

This simple activity will encourage your children to be creative and use critical thinking skills in a fun way.

Coloring and Painting

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Just Color ~ Easter

This is an Easter-themed coloring pack for kiddos who enjoy coloring or need something quiet to do for a little while.

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Easter Q-Tip Painting Printables

These Q-Tip coloring pages are fun for children, but they’re also great for helping develop eye-hand coordination!

Miscellaneous and Collections of Ideas

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Easter Traditions Around the World

Learn more about how other countries and cultures celebrate Easter with this fun printable booklet that all ages will enjoy.

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Easter Ideas and Experiment for Your Homeschool

In this article, we share a collection of ideas and experiments for the Easter season.

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Creative Ways to Decorate Easter Eggs

This is a fun assortment of articles sharing creative ways to dye and decorate Easter eggs!

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Easter Ideas, Activities, and Printables

This article is a collection of all kinds of printables, ideas, and activities for your children or for an Easter party, co-op, etc.

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Free Easter and Spring Printables

This collection includes printables for both Easter and spring. (Note: All of the printables were free at the time we created this collection.)

HHM Easter Confessions of a Homeschooler

Fun and Easy Easter Activities for Kids!

This resurrection garden is a wonderful way to remind your family of Jesus this Easter season.

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This is another collection of lots of fun printables and activities for Easter and spring.

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Easter Printable, Crafts, and More

Looking for printable craft ideas for Easter? You’ll find a great collection here!

10 Easter ideas and activities | Hip Homeschool Moms

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I Just Want My Son Back | What it Feels Like When Your Child is in Crisis

i just want my son back what it feels like when your child is in crisis

This is an electrical outlet in the emergency room. You’ll notice it looks different from what you’re used to seeing – it’s not only covered for safety, but locked.

There is no way to access it.

There is no way to charge my phone while we wait.

There is also no way for a child to harm themselves with it.

when your child is in crisis

This is what the outlets look like in the specialized rooms in a closed corner of the emergency room, where children are taken when they are brought in during a behavioral emergency. This is where children are taken when they attempt suicide, become so manic they’re uncontrollable, have psychotic breaks, fits of rage, and homicidal ideation.

This is where we ended up when my son attacked me.

when your child is in crisis

It’d never happened before, and I almost smugly believed it never would. I’m in a few Facebook groups for parents of troubled kids, I know a few families in real life who have had to bring their children to these rooms, but I always comforted myself that no matter how hard it got with my own boy, he’d never hurt me.

Until he did.

This room is so bare it’s unsettling. The bed and chair are made of a rubber-like foam. There is no bedding, no paper covers, no railing, no legs on any of them. Just blobs of hard, blue foam. The bed looks like a giant blue pill. There are no wires in this room. No call buttons, no lines to the oxygen in the wall. There’s a tv mounted behind a case but no remote to turn it on. Even the sink faucet is small with no visible plumbing.

“Where is the trash can?” my son asks.

“There’s not one in here. They can’t risk you throwing it at them.”

I look up, raising my eyes in an attempt to keep the hot tears from spilling out.

A failed attempt.

I see the large mirror in the corner that allows doctors and nurses to make sure no one is lying in wait to attack them. My son and I are sitting calmly on the giant blue pill bed and all that’s reflected back is how very empty the room is. Even with my eyes closed I can feel how empty it is.

I can feel how empty I am.

I know I’m not giving up. I know I never will give up. But right now, in this moment, on this hard, blue bed, I don’t know where I’ll draw my next breath from.

I’m so tired.

So worn.

So desperate.

So sad.

I know I’m not alone…

There are several rooms like this one in this corner of the ER, and many of them are currently occupied. The police are in the hall outside of another room, filling out paperwork and discussing the patient.

Will they come for my boy?

Has a nurse told them he hit me?

I clutch him, realizing all over again how serious this is. When you find yourself in a situation you never anticipated, you have to process it multiple times. It’s all too unreal to be real. It’s all so different, that you can protect yourself for a little while by not really accepting it.

Related: When Anxiety Looks Like Anger When Your Child is in Crisis

This Is What It’s Like When Your Child Is In Crisis

But those police officers are real.

My sweaty boy leaning against me is real.

The marks on my arm are real.

We are really here, in the emergency room, in a small, specialized room, designed to minimize the damage my child is apparently capable of.

I’m torn between wanting to cling to him and wanting the doctors to take him, just for a little while, just so he can get some help and I can get some respite.

Every parent likes to brag about their child when they’re asked about them, but instead I have to tell this intake specialist about the worst things my son has ever done.

His creativity and sense of humor don’t come up here.

No one is appreciating how well he does with his schoolwork.

Instead of eyebrows raising at being impressed by him, all of the brows around here are furrowed, worried, vigilant.

Are they judging me?

Do they think I let him get this way?

Do they wonder what I missed, what else I could have done?

Do they shake their heads at my decision to have children despite my family history of mental illness?

Do they search for ways to make this my fault?

Because I do.

I am.

I’m filled with guilt over something I didn’t even do.

I look down at my precious boy, leaning against me, calm, and lose touch of the reality we’re in just for a moment.

Surely this baby didn’t mean it.

Surely this will never happen again.

Surely this will be a wake up call to him and this behavior will stop.

But I’m not sure.

I don’t know what is causing this behavior.

I don’t know what will  help it.

I don’t know if we’ll be back in this room.

I know that I love him, and he loves me, but he is fighting something so strong inside him that he’s currently losing. He’s overtaken by something he’s not strong enough to fight on his own and has ended up on a hard, blue bed in a small, empty room.

He’s seen several doctors, several therapists, my boy. He’s been in various treatments for varying amounts of time over the years, and the diagnoses always change.

“It isn’t an exact science,” I’m told when I ask about the fluid, ever-changing labels. Then I’m handed a prescription for a very strong, very scientific medication and asked to trust the non-exact science with the very long list of side effects. No two therapists or doctors ever agree on what alphabet soup best explains my son, and I admit that as I grow increasingly dependent upon mental health professionals I trust them less and less.

He’s released.

He’s calmed down now and hasn’t made any threats against himself or anyone else.

He’s lucid but tired.

Without a charged phone or a clock I realize we went over 8 hours without eating and the knots in my stomach untie just enough to release a growl. I’m glad to be heading home with him. I know he didn’t need to stay, I know he didn’t meet the criteria for inpatient care, but I still feel like we didn’t accomplish anything.

I’ll follow up with his therapists tomorrow.

Tonight we’ll rest in our own beds — beds with linens and pillows and usable outlets nearby.

I don’t know if we’ll be back to that small, empty room with the hard, blue bed.

I don’t know what will happen tomorrow when I call his therapists.

I don’t know what will happen when we walk back into the familiar environment of our home where he punched, clawed, bit, and kicked me.

I don’t know what’s going on in that mind of his, and to be honest, I don’t really know what’s going on in mine. I’m too tired to think, or maybe too afraid to.

I never wanted to see a room like that one. I really didn’t even know they existed before tonight.

I never thought my boy would hurt me, on purpose, repeatedly.

We crossed more than one threshold today and I didn’t like what was on the other side.

I know that whatever awaits, whatever doors we have to go through or whatever rooms we have to revisit, I’ll be there.

Related: Helping Your Child Cope with AnxietyWhen Your Child is in Crisis

If Your Child Is In Crisis, You Are Not Alone.

I’ll keep going wherever my boy needs and sitting wherever we find ourselves. I’m not giving up, on him or the system that runs on inexact science.

I have to believe he’s still in there, my boy, somewhere under the angry layers he’s burrowed into.

I have to believe I’ll see him again someday, see a twinkle in his eye and not a fire.

I miss him.

Deeply.

Painfully.

Whoever said it was better to have loved and lost has never held the shell of their child. I have to get him back, for his sake and my own. So I will sit on 1000 hard blue beds and give up all the outlets in the world until some doctor, somehow, finds some relief for him.

I’m not alone.

I’m not at fault.

And I’m not giving up.

What It Feels Like When Your Child is in Crisis - Raising Lifelong Learners

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Fun and Educational St. Patrick’s Day Activities!

fun and educational st patricks day activities
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St. Patrick’s Day is coming up soon!  This Irish holiday honors the official patron saint of Ireland. However, the fun traditions of St. Patrick’s Day aren’t limited to Ireland. In fact, St. Patrick’s Day traditions have caught on all over the world! St. Patrick’s Day is now proudly celebrated in many countries, such as the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, and New Zealand.

St. Patrick's Day activities

Whether you are Irish, have Irish ancestors, or are just looking for some festive  ways to celebrate the unique culture of Ireland, we’re bringing you some fun and educational activities that you can use to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in your homeschool!

These crafty activities inspire hands-on learning and can be fun for the whole family to try together!

Create a “life-sized” Leprechaun hat with this fun and simple craft that utilizes those used up K Cups in your kitchen!

St. Patricks' Day Leprechaun hats craft

This shamrock wire bookmark is beautiful and features a very Celtic-inspired design! This would be a great craft to make with older kids, and one that they’ll enjoy using, too!

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The rainbow is a popular symbol in St. Patrick’s Day celebrations (after all, it’s where you can find the mythical leprechaun’s pot of gold!) Here are some rainbow-themed projects that combine a little bit of art and science to make some colorful, magical fun.

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Create a Saint Patrick’s day masterpiece and teach your little learner about ROYGBIV (color order) using playdough and this printable mat!

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This article also contains links to even more crafts and activities that you may enjoy using for St. Patrick’s Day!HHM St Patricks Day Pinnable Image

Just download and print these educational worksheets out to add some instant St. Patrick’s Day fun to your homeschool! 

This shamrock-themed printable offers a great visual aid to help children with multiplying by 3s and 4s!

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Use these worksheets to give your child some extra practice counting to 100 with festive, Leprechaun-themed pages.100s 400x600 1

Teaching young kids about skip-counting? Use these printable shamrock-themed worksheets that they can fill in and color, too!

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This article includes links to a variety of downloadable activities: a not-too-hard word search, a grammatical scavenger hunt, and a mad lib activity (all on theme for St. Patrick’s Day, of course!)

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Practice different tenses of verbs in a fun way with this Leprechaun-themed grammar printable!

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Use this St. Patrick’s Day Adjective Word Wall to introduce your child to adjectives or reinforce learning about parts of speech (or just use them for some St. Patrick’s Day themed spelling words!)

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Use this Leprechaun-themed word wall to help teach your child more about action verbs this St. Patrick’s Day! These also make great spelling words for young learners.

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This St. Patrick’s Day themed word wall will make it fun and easy for young children to learn about nouns!

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This fun and interesting cultural study will get kids involved in learning about the nation of Ireland! This printable has a huge variety of engaging activities that work for a wide range of ages.
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It’s funny to think that so many countries around the world celebrate a holiday that honors Ireland’s patron saint, but they do! This printable booklet would fun to read as a family and discover traditions that different places around the world observe on St. Patrick’s Day. Maybe you’ll even find some that you want to try in your homeschool!

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These Rainbow Tie-Dye Cupcakes would be the perfect colorful treat to enjoy on St. Patrick’s Day!

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This healthier twist on classic Mac & Cheese has hidden treasure (AKA green vegetables) and may just be your new lucky dish for picky eaters.IMG 2823

These thumbprint cookies are fun to make, look at and (of course) eat! Whimsical St. Patrick%E2%80%99s Day Cookies

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate (and a pinch of bright green!) You can’t go wrong with these Reverse Chocolate Cookies.

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These fun-to-make cupcakes represent the rainbow (on the inside) and the gold (at the top) which are both symbolic of Irish lore!

How to Make Rainbow Cupcakes

I hope you and your children have some fun celebrating St. Patrick’s Day while sneaking in some educational benefits using those activities.

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Great Books to Read with Your Kids in March

great books to read with your kids in march

Just as the daffodils are starting to break through the dirt and everyone is adventuring more and more outside, we cannot forget to take advantage of all these amazing books! Between outdoor adventures, St. Patrick’s Day, and Dr. Seuss’ birthday, there are many titles to choose from this month.

Check out these great books to read with your kids in March…

great children's books for march

What are you waiting for? Let’s dive right in.

Great Books to Read with Your Child in March

100 Backyard Activities That Are the Dirtiest, Coolest, Creepy-Crawliest Ever!: First up on the list is written by yours truly. Since the weather starts to get warmer in March, this book is the perfect way to get outdoors and explore everything from bugs to animals. It is time to turn the great outdoors into a living museum for your kids!

Planting a Rainbow: This book teaches kids how to plant seeds and bulbs. It also gives them direction on how to care for those growing seeds. Big bonus! The illustrations in this book are amazing!

In Like a Lion Out Like a Lamb: An adorable book with rhyming text and an excellent description of March in the form of a lion and a lamb.

Puddles: What type of joy can a rainstorm bring? Puddles of course! Grab your rain boots and get ready to explore puddles of every shape and size.

    

More Books To Read With Your Kids In March

The Wind Blew: Huge gusts of winds carry away everything out to sea. Before it is out of sight, the wind decides to bring it all back.

Kite Day: Take advantage of those high winds and get outside to fly a kite. In this story, Bear and Mole have to build their very own kite.

The Tiny Seed: Follow the life cycle of a seed along with the bright illustrations that can only come from an Eric Carle book.

The Curious Garden: A young boys finds a neglected garden and decides to take care of it. As soon as he the garden starts to grow it changes everything around him.

    

Great Books to Read to Your Kids for St. Paddy’s Day

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Clover: The old lady is back and hungry as ever in this classic with a St. Paddy’s day twist.

How to Catch a Leprechaun: This is a great book to read as you build a Leprechaun trap. Kids of all ages love to try and attempt to catch the magical Leprechaun who is impossible to capture!

The Night Before St. Patrick’s Day: There is so much anticipation the night before St. Patrick’s day. The Leprechaun trap is set… but will these kiddos be able to catch one?

   

Great Dr. Seuss Books to Read with Your Kids Anytime!

Dr. Seuss’ birthday is on March 2nd! Celebrate this incredible author by reading his silly yet wise stories. Here are some of our favorites.

Oh, The Thinks You Can Think!: Take a trip down thinking lane with this clever book that will get kids to explore their thoughts and all of the ideas that can come with it.

The Lorax: This book is a great way to introduce environmental awareness to kids. It shows the cause and effect of your actions when using up natural resources around us.

Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?: What a wise man Dr. Seuss was. Share that wisdom with your kids and teach them how to be grateful for everything they have.

What Was I Scared Of?: Give your kids a reason to not be scared of the dark with this cute story of a pair of pants… Scaredy-pants to be exact.

    

With all of these wonderful books to read will there still be time to tend the garden, celebrate the great outdoors as well as the silliest authors of all time? Of course! We are always looking for fun and educational ways to keep those kids busy and these books are the answer!

Feel free to share with me in the comments. What favorite books do your kids love to read in March?

 

More Fabulous Booklists For Your Kids!

    

Great Books to Read With Your Kids in March

100 Backyard Activities That Are the Dirtiest, Coolest, Creepy-Crawliest Ever a

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100 Hints That Your Child May Be Gifted

100 hints that your child may be gifted

Admit it, you’ve thought about it. You see your precious little one handling blocks with expert dexterity. Your heart swells as they garble through their ABCs. Your pride and joy is walking already or handles math problems with ease and you wonder, Could my child be gifted?

Maybe.

There is a growing community of support for gifted children, but still a lot of murky information about how to actually tell if your child is gifted. ~Raising Lifelong Learners #gifted

There is a growing community of support for the families of gifted children, but still a lot of murky information about how to actually tell if your child is gifted. I remember when my oldest was still a toddler, I was reading a popular parenting magazine and came across a one-page article discussing giftedness in children. Intrigued and convinced that my precious firstborn was obviously a genius, I began comparing him to the checklist they provided… and promptly discovered that he didn’t match a single criteria. Oh well, I thought. I wouldn’t know what to do with a genius. He’s fine how he is.

Years later, surprise! Not only is he gifted, but so is his brother… and his sister. It took a teacher telling us that they were likely gifted – and multiple test results – to convince me. As we began to learn more about what it meant to be gifted, hindsight became more and more clear. The signs were always there, I’d just been wholly misinformed as to what they were!

100 Hints That Your Child May Be Gifted

Here you’ll find 100 real-life and classic hints that your child may be gifted. Since gifted kids are as unique from one another as they are from the general population, not every one of these will be true for every gifted child, and there will definitely be anecdotes experienced by gifted families that aren’t mentioned here. But in general, you may very well have a gifted child on your hands if:

  1. The word “intensity” drums up your child’s image. Intensity is the hallmark of gifted children. Intense feelings, intense reactions, intense drive. Intensity is the word when it comes to gifted kids.

  2. Your child learned to read at an early age, or

  3. they taught themselves how to read.

  4. The questions never, ever stop.

  5. She often seems wise beyond her years, but

  6. sometimes she can seem to behave younger than her actual age, especially when it comes to social and emotional issues.

  7. He experiences fears that children his age don’t.

  8. They are aware of their own mortality.

  9. He sleeps less than other children. Less than the parenting articles say he needs. Less than you need to maintain your sanity.

  10. He takes hours to fall asleep – often because he can’t “turn his brain off”.

  11. She can draw inferences from data, evidence, or Sesame Street.

  12. She can grasp metaphors at a young age.

  13. He can understand and appreciate sarcasm.

  14. He is sarcastic.

  15. She isn’t content to simply absorb information and often asks “why?” what she’s learning is important

  16. They experience anxiety.

  17. He is able to grasp concepts quickly.

  18. She is observant.

  19. He has a large, diverse vocabulary.

  20. She does well in math and can easily apply mathematical concepts to new challenges.

  21. He can’t learn enough. His desire to investigate and ask questions and immerse himself in a subject is insatiable.

  22. She has a rich, vivid, active imagination.

  23. They make up their own elaborate rules to games… or even make up their own elaborate games.

  24. He has a strong sense of justice and becomes particularly upset when faced with inequality.

  25. She can pay attention for long periods of time, especially when compared to her age peers.

  26. He has an excellent memory and can recall facts and information accurately.

  27. Others commented on what an alert infant she was.

  28. He has an intense curiosity about just about everything.

  29. They experience intense reactions to pain.

  30. He corrects others, sometimes rudely, and is usually right.

  31. She has an increased sensitivity to sensory stimuli – noises are louder, smells are more offensive, sock seams are evil.

  32. He can retain information, not just sit through it.

  33. She experiences intense empathy for others in pain or peril.

  34. He thinks so far outside the box that sometimes the box is no longer visible.

  35. They offer creative solutions to basic – or complex – problems.

  36. She often has great insight into situations.

  37. He forms strong attachments – to people, to stuffed animals, to trains, to shoes, to a favorite toothbrush, to anything.

  38. She is able to identify connections between information, facts, and people.

  39. He’s just so original. Your kiddo is quirky and awesome and there doesn’t seem to be anyone like him.

  40. She requires fewer repetitions to master a new skill.

  41. They have passionate interest in (sometimes unusual) topics

  42. He can be pretty argumentative. Any disagreement is apparently an invitation to debate, and

  43. He oftentimes win those debates (whether you tell him or not is up to you!).

  44. She becomes frustrated with repetition and review. Spiral instruction is not for her.

  45. He lacks patience or understanding when others struggle with a task he’s mastered.

  46. She frequently finds school boring.

  47. They have very high standards for everyone around them, but they are often highest when it comes to what they expect from themselves. This often leads to

  48. Struggles with perfectionism.

  49. She daydreams.

  50. He craves and appreciates novelty.

  51. She has a deep self-awareness – though may lack the ability or language to actually identify and describe her inner experiences.

  52. He has an interest in politics and enjoys discussing the latest issues.

  53. They often speak quickly. Their little mouths sometimes can’t keep up with their excitement and ideas.

  54. He’s the classic absent-minded professor – brilliant and disorganized, smart but scattered.

  55. They have a parent or sibling who has been identified as gifted.

  56. She could carry out multi-step instructions from an early age.

  57. He’s very picky – food, textures, smells, oh my!

  58. She asks deep questions.

  59. He has little need for instruction and can often master skills on his own.

  60. She frequently seeks out older children or adults for conversation.

  61. He might have excessive energy, almost like he’s driven by a motor inside.

  62. She’s skeptical, sometimes cynical.

  63. They work well independently and

  64. May even prefer to work independently.

  65. She’s so creative.

  66. He’s aware of how different he is from the kids his own age.

  67. So. Much. Talking.

  68. He expressed an early interest and/or understanding of time.

  69. Her development is asynchronous.

  70. He spoke early… and well.

  71. She exhibited early mastery of motor skill functions.

  72. They hit several developmental milestones early.

  73. She has a deep need to learn, create, go, do…

  74. He has a laser-like focus and

  75. He’s able to multitask successfully.

  76. She has a great sense of humor.

  77. He appreciates puns and dad jokes, long before becoming an actual dad.

  78. She’s able to recognize problems and

  79. She’s able to propose solutions.

  80. “Why?”

  81. They have a wide knowledge base that comes from interests in multiple areas.

  82. He’s able to understand cause and effect relationships.

  83. She can imagine multiple outcomes to situations, which often causes her to

  84. Overthink instructions. In fact, she probably

  85. Overthinks everything.

  86. He can apply new concepts to multiple areas.

  87. She struggles socially, often because of the differences between her and her peers.

  88. He creates his own ways to solve math problems.

  89. They exhibited early pattern recognition.

  90. She’s often a square peg in a round hole world.

  91. He has a strong fear of or preoccupation with death.

  92. She is highly critical of herself.

  93. He doesn’t just get interested in a topic, he obsesses.

  94. They unknowingly dominate their peers.

  95. Their standards and expressive skills often push them towards natural leadership.

  96. She deeply experiences her surroundings.

  97. He doesn’t blindly accept unproven authority.

  98. What’s normal for her sounds like you’re bragging to others.

  99. He has a low threshold for frustration.

  100. She thrives on complexity.

Related: If He’s REALLY So Smart… When Gifted Kids Struggle

100 hints your child may be gifted

 

Is My Child Really Gifted If They Are Struggling In School?

You may notice that among the 100 traits listed above, not once were grades mentioned as an indicator of giftedness. Being a gifted child is not all about straight-A’s and perfect test scores, it’s a neurological difference that affects many, many areas of their lives and really turns up the intensity knob.

Sure, many gifted kids have impressive report cards, but they also have struggles, fears, and unique experiences that set them apart from the crowd.

No question, It is a unique set of complex circumstances that creates a unique family dynamic and educational challenges. 

But please know, you are not alone in it. 

Are You Homeschooling A Gifted Child?

The Learner's Lab

The Learner’s Lab is the community created just for your quirky family.  It’s full of creative lessons, problem solving activities, critical and divergent thinking games, and the social-emotional support differently-wired children and teens need most.

All from the comfort of your own home. 

This community was created to support children who are gifted and twice exceptional. We address topics just like this all year long, in a way that is educational and fun for children. They learn skills to help them cope and you learn how to help them along the way. 

We invite you to join us. Get all the details HERE.

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RLL #107: Learning as an Unschooling Family with Robyn Robertson

rll 107 learning as an unschooling family with robyn robertson

 

I truly believe that the best way we can educate our gifted and twice-exceptional (2E) kids is through homeschooling with self-directed learning and unschooling.

Self-Directed Learning vs. Unschooling?

Self-directed learning is a self-motivated pursuit of knowledge not based on a required set of circumstances but learning for its own sake. Using an unschooling approach to learning simply means that activities and lessons are not structured or required.

Children constantly learn through their interactions and experiences with the world around them.  Many families find that creating their own flexible homeschool and allowing their kids to be the driving force in their learning is the very best educational option for our above-average kids.

RLL #107: Learning as an Unschooling Family with Robyn Robertson

Self-directed learning and unschooling is better for gifted and 2E learners

Our kids aren’t cookie cutter, why would we think a one size fits all of educating will fit them? An example might be a kiddo who loves math and excels ahead of his same-age peers but is also struggling with reading. We could encourage his reading through the “strewing” of picture books about math, making them available for him to discover. This would likely be more interesting to him than a remedial reading curriculum. 

A lot of gifted kids are energized by making “dive deeps” into areas of interest. In our family, there is a genuine need to go into detailed study! Just because measures like tests or projects show mastery has occurred doesn’t mean our kids are done with learning about the subject. With self-directed homeschooling, limits are easily removed in open-ended learning at home; there is no timetable to follow. By exploring those tangents, our kids are motivated to learn more in depth and with greater passion.

The benefits of self-directed learning and unschooling point to just how good it is for gifted and 2E kids.

There’s a confidence that comes to children when they have buy-in to their learning. Self-directed learners are motivated in their learning and hesitate less to investigate new things.

More flexible learning gives us a way where overexcitabilities and asynchrony are less of an issue. Home is a safer environment in which to learn strategies to handle differences and adjust behaviors.  Homeschooling parents are readily available to give our kids the support they need if they’re asynchronous. Scaffolding can provide for areas where our child might struggle, so that they can continue to learn and create at their level. Take for example the child who has difficulty with handwriting, but who has a great imagination and concocts wonderfully imaginative stories. Allowing her to dictate her story to a parent to record is a way of giving her space to explore her talent as a “writer” while supporting her as she works on penmanship.

Unschooling benefits the whole family by creating space to create.

Grace Llewellyn explains, “You don’t need a schoolteacher to get knowledge – you can get it from looking at the world, from watching films, from conversations, from reading, from asking questions, from experience. When you get down to it, unschooling is really just a fancy term for ‘life’ or ‘growing up uninstitutionalized.’” 

Unschooling gives us more room to explore interests and have wonderful life experiences in the safest of environments, within the family, those relationships will always be their very best teacher. Important skills like critical thinking, problem solving, fostering authenticity and lifelong learning take time and attention which we can adjust and focus on while we homeschool.

Ultimately, as parents of these “outside-the-box thinkers,” we learn to trust our children better and respect their learning needs. All kids have an intrinsic desire to learn and create; but our kids tend towards MORE of everything. In self-directed learning and unschooling, we can be our kiddos’ greatest champion, cheering them on to becoming the very best people they can be.

unschooling life learning grace llewellyn

Families who already use self-directed learning and unschooling provide support and encouragement.

This week’s podcast episode is a conversation with Robyn Robertson of Honey I’m Homeschooling the Kids. She shares the background of her unschooling family and makes an important analogy of self-directed learning as being a journey we travel on with our entire family.  Some of the ideas Robyn and Colleen share in this episode are:

  • Travel together as a family in your learning, even if everyone is learning about different things.
  • Keep going back to knowing why you’re doing it and adjust as needed.
  • Experience life together, share stories as a family. This will cause you to build connections through these shared experiences.
  • Take field trips, have family projects, attend independent classes and enrichment programs, enroll in online courses and exercise programs, and leave room for a lot of personal time. If the individual wants to pursue a formal class, that can be unschooling as well!

Learning Mindset Happiness is goal Robyn Robertson

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

            

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    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
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If He’s REALLY So Smart… When Gifted Kids Struggle

if hes really so smart when gifted kids struggle

“Boy is he an EXTREME thinker! If he actually took the time to sit and focus on his work, he could accomplish anything…”

when gifted children struggle

As helpful and positive as his preschool teacher thought she was being, words like this can set some of our most intelligent kiddos up for a lifetime of failure. So, why do some gifted children struggle so much?

If they’re really as smart as we say they are, why can’t some of them just do their work? Or behave better? Or act nicer? Or…?

I remember watching my son spin in circles in the back of his preschool classroom while the others sat raptly taking in their teacher’s read aloud. And cringing. Why couldn’t he just sit still? All the other kids were managing it.

Never mind that he understood everything that was going on in the story, and could recount whole passages, identify individual characters and speak to their motivation, inferring cause and effect at a much higher lever than any of his intently listening classmates. He couldn’t do it in a way that didn’t disrupt the others – or distract the teacher.

Related: A Kid with an Issue Can’t Be Gifted, Right?

Twice Exceptional Gifted Children

 

What do Twice Exceptional Children Look Like?

Twice exceptional children are gifted kiddos who struggle with other neurological, learning, or physical issues. Twice exceptional children can look perfectly ordinary in a classroom setting. Their abilities mask their disabilities, and their disabilities mask their abilities, making them seem perfectly average.

Sometimes, though, a child’s giftedness might shine through more than his disability, making it seem like he’s not living up to his potential. He seems like he should be achieving so much ore than he is, but is choosing not to. The reality is that his difficulties make it impossible to live up to his potential. He just can’t overcome them without intervention.

I remember the fall parent-teacher conference we went to when our son was in first grade. We were invited to look inside his desk to see what his teacher “had to put up with.” Our kiddo, who meticulously organized his action figures, cars, and LEGO each night before he went to bed, had a desk full to the brim with crumpled papers, broken pencils, dried out markers, and ripped folders. There was also a thick stack of unfinished worksheets in a folder.

Those were the ones he’d never turned in because they’d gotten lost somewhere in his desk or classroom. The teacher had recopied them and placed them in a new folder for our bright, hyperactive, wiggly, and sensory kiddo to work on instead of going out to recess with his friends.

Does this sound familiar?

Many twice exceptional children struggle with executive functioning issues, and can’t organize their thinking enough to turn things in, keep things organized (when they’re not interested), or follow multiple step directions. It doesn’t matter how smart they are, they just can’t do it. Their lack of organizational skills results in a messy desk, overflowing backpack, and problems keeping track of books and papers. Difficulties with prioritizing and planning make it impossible for them to complete assignments in a timely manner. They are easily distracted and struggle to focus and sustain attention.

Related: Homeschooling Twice Exceptional Kids

Twice Exceptional Gifted Children

 

Why Do Twice Exceptional Children Struggle?

The extreme frustration these kiddos feel when they can’t meet their own and others’ expectations, combined with the frustration of adults who don’t understand why a bright child does not achieve, can lead to conflict, misunderstandings, and failure.

Our twice exceptional kids can seem stubborn, opinionated, and argumentative, but they also appear to be overly sensitive to criticism. Many of these kiddos struggle with social skills which leads to feelings of isolation when they have trouble making and keeping friends. In order to avoid failing, 2e kids may try to manipulate the situation or simply refuse to try an assignment.

These kids are literally wired to struggle.

I mean, really, can you imagine how incredibly difficult it must be to have big thoughts swirling around your head, with the cognitive ability to understand things at a much deeper level than kids your age normally can, but have trouble spelling or reading words?

My 6 year old struggles mightily with sensory processing disorder, anxiety, and reading. She solves math problems for fun. Asks for science experiments and documentaries. Can converse at length about an incredibly intricate and imaginative world that lives only in her head. But she can’t read the simplest text. Her thinking is complex, but she lacks the skills to work independently because she has such trouble with words. It is incredibly frustrating for her.

And, since she already battles anxiety, the difficulties she faces with reading make her feel like a failure, and she acts out and argues when it’s time to read.

Yet she adores stories. She’ll look at the pictures in books for hours and listen to audio books and read alouds all day long. She can make the most amazing connections between what’s happening in stories she hears and the world in which she lives.

Related: Parenting and Teaching a Twice Exceptional Child

Twice Exceptional Gifted Children

 

Living a Gifted/Twice Exceptional Life

We’re in a wonderful position because with homeschooling, we can easily nurture her giftedness while remediating for her disabilities in a loving way. It’s often thought that kids need to have their problems solved before working on pushing their strengths further, academically, but research shows the opposite is true. When we focus on a child’s strengths and build them up, they gain the confidence they need to tackle those deficits.

When gifted kids struggle with anxiety, ADHD, learning disabilities, sensory processing disorder, or other struggles they need to be nurtured and built up by the ones they trust most – parents, teachers, and friends. It’s important to work together with the other people in your kiddo’s life to help them understand how best to help your child.

And your twice exceptional child needs to know what a gift he or she is to you. When someone says or implies that, if your child is so smart he should just get it and be able to be successful, you need to be the one to educate – whether it’s a family member, friend, or teacher.

You’re your child’s biggest advocate. And he’s perfect just the way he is.

Extreme thinking and all…

What “If he’s really so smart…” moments have you had lately?

You Don’t Have To Homeschool Your Gifted Child Alone!

The Learner's Lab

The Learner’s Lab is the community created just for your quirky family.  It’s full of creative lessons, problem solving activities, critical and divergent thinking games, and the social-emotional support differently-wired children and teens need most.

All from the comfort of your own home. 

This community was created to support children who are gifted and twice exceptional. We address topics just like this all year long, in a way that is educational and fun for children. They learn skills to help them cope and you learn how to help them along the way. 

We invite you to join us. Get all the details HERE.

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RLL #106: [Audioblog] Young Gifted Children | Reflections from Parents

rll 106 audioblog young gifted children reflections from parents


Did you just know that your child was gifted from the start? You know, that feeling down deep in your gut that something was different about your tiny tot, but you weren’t able to completely pinpoint it?  Or maybe you went straight to a search engine with questions like, “signs my baby is gifted” or “What age can you tell if your child is gifted?”

Research shows that parents are pretty accurate when identifying their young children as gifted.  Whether early talking or walking, having extreme abilities of observation or learning, or even needing little sleep, a lot of our quirky kids start demonstrating unusually advanced behaviors from a very young age!

Today’s episode is an audioblog of a post that first appeared on the website, where Colleen asked parents to think back to when their young children were infants or toddlers. The responses were fascinating! Listen as parents share in their own words what traits and characteristics they could see now, in hindsight, that made them realize their child was gifted.  

RLL #106: [Audioblog] Young Gifted Children | Reflections from Parents

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

         

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!