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African Development Bank highlights the need for strategic partnerships and innovative financing mechanisms to promote quality education and skills…

The African Development Bank joined the Global Partnership for Education and other multilateral development banks during the Global Education Summit: Financing GPE 2021-2025, to call for stronger strategic partnerships to build innovative financing mechanisms in support of quality education and skills development.

The summit was co-hosted by the President of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta, and U.K. Prime Minister, Boris Johnson.

The Bank’s Vice President of Agriculture, Human and Social Development, Dr. Beth Dunford, participated in a session on the leadership of multilateral development banks in financing education. Participants in this session discussed the rising priority of investing in education, the challenges of growing education portfolios and the economic impacts of Covid-19, as well as the efforts of multilateral banks to help countries transform their education systems.

“The overall financing gap is enormous. Prior to Covid-19, estimates show that in Africa we need $40 billion a year to bridge the education financing gap by 2030, and this figure is going to increase post pandemic,” Dunford said.

“That is why, at the international level, and in a time of mounting debt and fiscal constraints, we join the Global Partnership for Education in emphasizing domestic financing and complementarity within the global financing architecture,” she added.

Dunford stressed the role of the Bank in leading from the front to create innovative financing mechanisms for education. She underscored the Bank and the African Union Commission partnership to develop a $300 million African Education, Science, Technology and Innovation Fund, to boost investments in Africa’s human capital development, including technical and vocational education, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The goal of the summit was to provide an opportunity for leaders to make five-year pledges to support the Global Partnership for Education’s work and help transform education systems in up to 90 countries and territories, where 80% of the world’s out-of-school children live.

Participants discussed member countries’ appetite for education sector projects, particularly given the impact of indebtedness and Covid-19 and made the case for education by underlining the clear links between learning and economic growth.

Dr. Bandar Hajjar, the President of the Islamic Development Bank (IsDB) noted that the IsDB recognized the power of education to sustain a society and play a role in building peaceful, stable and prosperous countries. He observed that our joint efforts to invest in quality education now would help shape the future.

The participants called for a strategic partnership to build innovative financing mechanisms to develop skills for the labour market of today and tomorrow.

Masatsugu Asakawa, the President of the Asian Development Bank, said his Bank was supporting the recovery of the education sector from the pandemic. He highlighted that, more than ever before, there was a need to work together to redouble our investment in education and provide innovative solutions to the challenges that our countries face.

Dr. Mari Pangestu, the Managing Director, Development Policy and Partnerships at the World Bank, also recognized the level of learning poverty caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. “Three things are crucial at this moment: get kids back to school safely; regain the learning losses; and empower teachers and, in the context of build back better, start investing in the longer-term learning systems,” Pangestu said.

Watch the session here.

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Security Council Adopts Presidential Statement Recognizing Progress to Advance Peace, Security in Darfur Following Hybrid Operation Drawdown

Security Council Adopts Presidential Statement Recognizing Progress to Advance Peace, Security in Darfur Following Hybrid Operation Drawdown – African Union News Today – EIN Presswire

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JUST IN: DCP Tunji Disu Replaces Abba Kyari As IRT Boss


The Inspector-General of Police, Usman Alkali Baba, has approved the posting of DCP Tunji Disu as the new Head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT).

This comes after the suspension of DCP Abah Kyari who was involved in a multi-million dollar wire fraud alongside Hushpuppy.


According to the police, the posting of Tunji Disu as the new IRT boss is on the heels of management’s decision to fill the leadership gap within the IRT and refocus the Unit for better service delivery.

The IGP further assured that the IRT will remain focused in the discharge of its professional mandate.

Read the full statement below


The Inspector-General of Police, IGP Usman Alkali Baba, psc (+), NPM, fdc has today, 2nd August, 2021 approved the posting of DCP Tunji Disu as the new Head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT). The posting of the officer is on the heels of Management’s decision to fill the leadership gap within the IRT and refocus the Unit for better service delivery.

  1. The IGP has charged the new Head of the IRT to demonstrate his professional competence in his leadership of the Unit. He also assured citizens that the IRT will remain focused in the discharge of its duties in line with national statutes and international best practices.

  2. Prior to his appointment as the new Head of the IRT, DCP Tunji Disu, a former Commander of the Rapid Response Squad (RRS) Lagos State, was the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Department of Operations, Force Headquarters, Abuja. He had also previously served at the State CID, Rivers State as the Deputy Head of the Unit. He was also a former Commander of the Nigeria Police Contingent to the African Union (AU) Peace Keeping Mission in Dafur, Sudan.

  3. DCP Disu holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the Lagos State University (LASU) and a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the Adekunle Ajasin University, Ondo State. He has also attended several professional courses both at home and abroad: Small Arms Smuggling Training in Botswana, Internet Fraud Training at the Cambridge University, UK, Strategic Leadership Command Course at the Police Staff College, Jos, Forensic Investigations and Criminal Intelligence Course at the University of Lagos, amongst others. He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Nigeria Institute of Public Relations and Chattered Institute of Personnel management, amongst other professional bodies.

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BREAKING: IGP appoints replacement for suspended Abba Kyari

The Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Usman Baba has appointed Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Tunji Disu as the new head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT).

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The posting of Disu, the IGP said, is on the heels of Management’s decision to fill the leadership gap within the IRT and refocus the Unit for better service delivery.

DCP Abba Kyari, who occupied the post, was suspended at the weekend following his alleged involvement in the sharing of $1.1m loot by internet fraudster Hushpuppi, according to an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

A statement on Monday by the Force Police Public Relations Officer, CP Frank Mba said: “The Inspector-General of Police, IGP Usman Alkali Baba, psc (+), NPM, fdc has today, 2nd August, 2021 approved the posting of DCP Tunji Disu as the new Head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT).

“The IGP has charged the new Head of the IRT to demonstrate his professional competence in his leadership of the Unit.

“He also assured citizens that the IRT will remain focused in the discharge of its duties in line with national statutes and international best practices.

“Prior to his appointment as the new Head of the IRT, DCP Tunji Disu, a former Commander of the Rapid Response Squad (RRS) Lagos State, was the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Department of Operations, Force Headquarters, Abuja.

  “He had also previously served at the State CID, Rivers State as the Deputy Head of the Unit. He was also a former Commander of the Nigeria Police Contingent to the African Union (AU) Peace Keeping Mission in Dafur, Sudan.

“DCP Disu holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the Lagos State University (LASU) and a Master Degree in Public Administration from the Adekunle Ajasin University, Ondo State.

“He has also attended several professional courses both at home and abroad: Small Arms Smuggling Training in Botswana, Internet Fraud Training at the Cambridge University, UK, Strategic Leadership Command Course at the Police Staff College, Jos, Forensic Investigations and Criminal Intelligence Course at the University of Lagos, amongst others.

“He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Nigeria Institute of Public Relations and Chattered Institute of Personnel management, amongst other professional bodies”.

The posting, Baba said, is with immediate effect.

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BREAKING: IGP appoints Tunji Disu to replace Abba Kyari as IRT Head

The Inspector-General of Police, Usman Baba, has appointed DCP Tunji Disu as the new Head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT)

He replaces DCP Abba Kyari who was suspended following a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) indictment.

Kyari was linked with Ramon Abbas a.k.a. Hushpuppi, a Nigerian facing trial for fraud in the United States of America.

Force spokesman, Frank Mba announced Disu’s posting in a statement on Monday.

Nigeria Police IG suspends Abba Kyari, panel begins probe

Mba said the Police took the decision to “refocus the IRT for better service delivery”.

Baba charged bring his professional competence to the new role.

Disu was formerly Commander of the Rapid Response Squad (RRS) Lagos State.

He was also the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Department of Operations, Force Headquarters, Abuja.

Disu previously served at the State CID, Rivers State as the Deputy Head of the Unit.

He was also a former Commander of the Nigeria Police Contingent to the African Union (AU) Peace Keeping Mission in Dafur, Sudan.

Disu holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the Lagos State University (LASU) and a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the Adekunle Ajasin University, Ondo State.

He attended several professional courses including Small Arms Smuggling Training in Botswana; Internet Fraud Training at the Cambridge University, UK; Strategic Leadership Command Course at the Police Staff College, Jos; Forensic Investigations and Criminal Intelligence Course at the University of Lagos, amongst others.

He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Nigeria Institute of Public Relations and Chattered Institute of Personnel management, among other.

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IGP Appoints Tunji Disu as Replacement for Abba Kyari

DCP Tunji Disu

Sequel to suspension of DCP Abba Kyari, Nigeria’s Police Chief, Usman , Monday, approved the posting of DCP Tunji Disu as the new Head of the Police Intelligence Response Team (IRT).

The posting of the officer is on the heels of Management’s decision to fill the leadership gap within the IRT and refocus the Unit for better service delivery.

Prompt News reports that follwing the recommendation of IGP , the Police Service Commission on Sunday, approved the suspension of Abba Kyari, a deputy commissioner of police, who has been indicted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the United States in the trial of Ramon Abas, aka ‘Hushpuppi’ for internet fraud.

Consequently, the IGP has charged the new Head of the IRT to demonstrate his professional competence in his leadership of the Unit.

He also assured citizens that the IRT will remain focused in the discharge of its duties in line with national statutes and international best practices.

Prior to his appointment as the new Head of the IRT, DCP Tunji Disu, a former Commander of the Rapid Response Squad (RRS) , was the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Department of Operations, Force Headquarters, Abuja.

He had also previously served at the State CID, Rivers State as the Deputy Head of the Unit. He was also a former Commander of the Nigeria Police Contingent to the African Union (AU) Peace Keeping Mission in Dafur, Sudan.

DCP Disu holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University (LASU) and a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the Adekunle Ajasin University, Ondo State.

He has also attended several professional courses both at home and abroad: Small Arms Smuggling Training in Botswana, Internet Fraud Training at the Cambridge University, UK, Strategic Leadership Command Course at the Police Staff College, Jos, Forensic Investigations and Criminal Intelligence Course at the University of Lagos, amongst others.

He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Nigeria Institute of and Chattered Institute of Personnel management, amongst other professional bodies.

His posting is with immediate effect, Force Officer, CP Frank Mba says in a statement.

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Tirumurti encourages UNITAMS support to Sudan

In a UN statement, the Indian Ambassador to UN said: “The Security Council underscores the importance of the continued support of bilateral, regional and multilateral partners and encourages continued support to Sudan in order to further consolidate peace and stability in Darfur. In this regard, the Security Council underscores the important role being played by the United Nations Integrated Transition Assistance Mission in Sudan (UNITAMS) and its integrated United Nations Country Team (UNCT) in support of the Government of Sudan’s efforts.”As the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) completed its drawdown on June 30 this year, the Security Council recognised the progress made in Darfur since 2007.

According to the statement, the Council took note of the oral report delivered by the Under Secretary-General for Operational Support at the 8825th meeting of the Security Council, held on July 27 entitled “The Reports of the Secretary-General on Sudan and South Sudan”, including details on UNAMID’s drawdown and the remaining liquidation phase.

The Security Council also looks forward to receiving an assessment of lessons learned from the experience of UNAMID no later than October 31 2021, as requested in resolution 2559 (2020). The Security Council expresses its intention to consider these lessons learned in its ongoing work to enhance the overall effectiveness of United Nations peacekeeping, including its approach to peacekeeping transitions.

Recalling resolution 2559 (2020), the Security Council welcomes the Government of Sudan’s cooperation with the United Nations and African Union during UNAMID’s drawdown, and reiterates its call on the Government of Sudan, at all levels, as well as other relevant stakeholders including the Juba Peace Agreement signatories, and non-signatoryarmed opposition movements, to cooperate fully with the United Nations and the African Union during UNAMID’s liquidation phase, including by fully respecting all provisions of the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) of February 9, 2008.

The Security Council also welcomed the signing of the Framework Agreement of March 4 between the United Nations and the Government of Sudan and, in this regard, urges the Government of Sudan to ensure that handed-over UNAMID team sites are used exclusively for civilian end-user purposes.

It took note of UNAMID’s near completed efforts to destroy expired ammunition, which will positively reduce safety hazards and the probability of their misuse. The Security Council also noted that in implementing UNAMID’s liquidation, the United Nations will comply with general United Nations practices and financial regulations.

The Security Council expresses its deep appreciation for the important contribution of UNAMID and its civilian and uniformed personnel, particularly those who gave their lives while serving to promote peace and stability throughout UNAMID’s operations in Darfur over a period of more than thirteen years, the statement added.

It commended the people of Darfur for their resilience and cooperation with UNAMID to contribute to peace efforts in Darfur. The Security Council also takes this opportunity to express its appreciation for the efforts of the Secretary-General, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission, their Joint Special Representative(JSR), Jeremiah Kingsley Mamabolo, and all the preceding JSRs of UNAMID.

In this regard, the Security Council commends the unique partnership between the United Nations and the African Union in the establishment and operation of UNAMID. The Security Council further commends the contribution of troop- and police-contributing countries and donors in support of UNAMID’s mandate.

The Security Council recognised improvements in security conditions in some areas of Darfur and stresses the need for continued progress to consolidate peace and security, including through comprehensive implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement.

Affirming the primary responsibility of the Government of Sudan to protect civilians across its territory, the Council urged the Government of Sudan to implement swiftly its National Plan for Civilian Protection.

The Security Council encouraged further steps to promote and protect women’s rights andfull, equal and meaningful participation in all social, political, economic aspects of life, as well as efforts to include youth in such spheres. The Security Council also encourages further efforts to build confidence of local communities in the ability of the rule of law institutions to deliver justice and ensure accountability. (ANI)

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Africa can prevent Ethiopia from going down Rwanda’s path: here’s how

When Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 2019, I congratulated him in a public US and Africa dialogue forum. I thought he deserved the prize, given what he had done. In particular he showed a calm and responsible interest in listening to all community grievances to avoid outbursts of war.

Today, under Abiy’s watch, Ethiopia has descended into a political and humanitarian crisis that threatens the very survival of the federal state. There are reports of ethnic groups in various regions mobilising local militias to take sides in the ongoing war in Tigray and surrounding regions. The war between Tigray rebel forces and allied government troops from Ethiopia and Eritrea has been marked by massacres and sexual violence. Thousands have been killed and now hundreds of thousands are at risk of famine.

The ethnic nature of conflict is not new. It was evident in 17 years of authoritarianism and war that lasted between 1974 and 1991. It drove the sporadic outbursts of micro-wars, pitting ethnic group against ethnic group, and region against region. The result was the famine of 1984.

That cycle is repeating itself in nearly one year of war between two armed agents of related names – Tigray Defence Forces, and Ethiopian National Defence Forces. Ethiopian specialists who have studied this cyclical phenomenon fear for the survival of a multi-ethnic Ethiopia. The fear is that there will be a permanent state of ethnic warfare.

In my mind, two factors should be raising alarm bells about the current situation. One is paralysis in intervening to end the conflict – both internationally and from within Africa. The other is the rhetoric of genocide that has crept into the public discourse. Both factors are all too reminiscent of the prelude to the Rwanda genocide in 1994.

As I argue in my analysis of international inaction in Rwanda, Africa needs to embrace a new approach that focuses on what countries in an embattled region can do to intervene. This approach should be a moral conversation that explores plausible ways in which a region and its community of people and nation-states can act, collectively, to prevent genocide.

Africa should seize its moment in Ethiopia.

Community response

More than two decades after the genocide in Rwanda, published reflections on that catastrophe tread a familiar path. They focus, understandably, on the root causes of the genocide and the international response to it.

On the response theme, they decry the tepid reaction of the international community. This is a coded description of the US as a superpower and the United Nations as the mandated international organisation. This narrative highlights what this particular community of nations could have done – yet failed to do – to stop the killing after it had begun.

This analytic approach to the genocide in Rwanda assumes that African countries are either incapable of, or not at all responsible for, solving problems in their neighbourhoods. Or, worse, that only the US or the UN are responsible for or capable of stopping genocide wherever it occurs. This assumption overstates the ability or willingness of both to shoulder this immense responsibility. It also undervalues the obligations of local communities to become guardians of their neighbourhoods.

The community approach is anchored in UN principles first outlined at a summit in September 2005. The summit called on all its member states to accept the new principle of the

While the aims are laudable the “responsibility to protect” has its drawbacks. In countries such as China and Russia the concept is dismissed as a western instrument for “regime change“.

In Africa, the history of colonial rule gives purveyors of hate crimes a potent and emotional tool to characterise western interventions as another form of imperialism or neo-colonialism dressed up as a moral responsibility to protect.

In my view new strategies of genocide prevention in Africa should be developed that don’t depend on international actors but primarily on national governments. As a moral principle, the right to protect can best be implemented through local and regional groups, with some foreign help.

Thus, I have proposed the alternative strategy – an obligation to prevent.

Obligation to prevent in practice

Ethiopia imploding would put the entire East African region in peril. It would threaten the seat of the African Union, which is currently Addis Ababa. It would tarnish the image of Africa as well as that of a nation that has a unique historical connection to international law. Ethiopia was the first nation to sign the UN Genocide Convention and associate itself with the ideals of peace and genocide-prevention.

It is not too late for Ethiopia’s leaders and all Ethiopians to reflect on the promise of Ethiopia’s moral past and the obligations of its present: an obligation to prevent the current situation in Tigray from descending into a genocide.

But Ethiopia can’t avoid disaster on its own. It needs the community of African countries to put their energies to the task of avoiding an implosion in the country.

Author: Edward Kissi – Associate Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Global Studies, University of South Florida The Conversation

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Chakwera to travel to South Sudan, United States

President Lazarus Chakwera is expected to travel to South Sudan this month to witness arrival of goods being exported from Malawi under a trade deal between Malawi and South Sudan.

Chakwera’s executive assistant Sean Kampondeni announced the upcoming presidential trip during a press briefing this morning.

Kampondeni noted that on 1 January this year, countries of the African Union ratified the African Free Trade Area (AFTA) but no trade deal has been undertaken under the AFTA.

The first deal will be between Malawi and South Sudan where Malawi will export goods such as maize flour to South Sudan.

“Because this is the first of its kind on the African continent, and Malawi is spearheading this movement, the president has been invited by the secretariat of the Africa Free Trade Area to be present when the goods that have been dispatched from Malawi are to be exported.

“Ever since he was leader of opposition, the president has always championed increasing Malawi’s exports in order to correct the imbalance between imports and exports. So, the present is gong to be present for that particular launch,” said Kampondeni.

He added that the dates for the trip will be provided once the logistics have been finalized.

Next month, President Lazarus will attend the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in the United States.  According to Kampondeni, there are indications that President Chakwera, who will become SADC chairperson this month, will be requested to attend in person, not virtually as e did last year.

In November, Chakwera will travel to Glasgow, Scotland for the Climate Summit where he is expected to meet UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

In January next year, Chakwera will attend the Least Developed Countries (LDC) conference in Doha which will be hosted by the Government of Qatar.

“The president will be presiding over the event as chairperson of LDC,” said Kampondeni.

Chakwera yesterday arrived from the UK where he spent a week and attended the two-day Global Education Summit.

Malawians on social media have been saying that President Chakwera undertakes unnecessary local and foreign trips.  There are concerns that the president is wasting public funds through the trips.

Some Malawians have nicknamed the president ‘Vilemi Dazi’ and Siku Transport, saying he is usually here today and there tomorrow .

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Yoweri Museveni Fast Facts

CNN Editorial Research

Here is a look at the life of Yoweri Museveni, president of Uganda since 1986.

Personal

Birth date: August 15,1944

Birth place: Ntungamo, Uganda

Birth name: Yoweri Kaguta Museveni

Father: Amos Kaguta, a cattle keeper

Mother: Esteri Kokundeka

Marriage: Janet (Kataaha) Museveni (August 1973-present)

Children: one son, three daughters

Education: Dar Es Salaam University (Tanzania), B.A., Economics, 1970

Religion: Christian

Timeline

1970 – Returns to Uganda after college and works for Prime Minister Milton Obote.

January 25, 1971Goes into exile in Tanzania when Obote is overthrown by Idi Amin. While in Tanzania, forms the Front for National Salvation (FRONASA) with the purpose of overthrowing Amin.

April 1979 FRONASA overthrows Amin and Museveni takes a position on the Military Commission, the newly formed government of Uganda.

1979-1980Minister of Defense, Uganda.

1981-1986Guerilla leader (National Resistance Army) in Uganda.

January 26, 1986 – Becomes president of Uganda after ousting the military regime of General Tito Okello. Is sworn in January 29.

May 1996 – Is elected president of Uganda with 74.2% of the vote in the first direct presidential election in Uganda since independence from Britain in 1962.

March 24, 1998 – US President Bill Clinton meets with Museveni in Uganda.

March 2001 – Is reelected president of Uganda with 69.3% of the vote.

May 6, 2002 – Meets with US President George W. Bush at the White House to discuss ways to get more Ugandan products into the US market.

July 11, 2003 – Bush meets with Museveni in Entebbe, Uganda, to speak about AIDS.

August 2005Uganda’s parliament removes presidential term limits.

February 25, 2006 – Museveni is declared the winner of Uganda’s first multi-party presidential election. It is his third term in office.

August 2006The Ugandan government and the Lord’s Resistance Army sign a truce aimed at ending 20 years of civil war in the country. The war has killed tens of thousands and displaced two million people.

October 30, 2007 – Museveni meets with Bush at the White House.

November 2010 – Museveni releases a song and accompanying music video, “U Want Another Rap?” as part of his reelection campaign.

November 29, 2010 – Museveni takes a surprise trip to Somalia, making him the first head of state to visit in almost 20 years, according to the African Union Mission for Somalia.

February 20, 2011 – Uganda’s electoral commission declares Museveni the president with 68% of the vote. It is his fourth term in office.

February 24, 2014 – Museveni signs into law a controversial bill that toughens penalties against gay people and makes some homosexual acts crimes punishable by life in prison. During the bill signing, he declares that he will not allow the West to impose its values on Uganda.

July 31, 2015 – Museveni says he will seek his fifth term as president in 2016 elections, 30 years after assuming the office for the first time.

February 20, 2016 – Uganda’s election commission declares Museveni the winner, with nearly twice as many votes for president as his closest competitor, opposition leader Kizza Besigye. Besigye was put under “preventative arrest” on February 19 at his home in Kampala, along with six officials from his party. Besigye’s party, the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) rejects the results and demands an independent audit of the elections.

May 12, 2016 – Museveni is sworn in for his fifth term as president.

July 11, 2016 – Facebook photos of Museveni sitting in a lawn chair by the roadside making a phone call in Kyeirumba Village, Uganda, go viral, inspiring an online meme.

July 27, 2018 – A Ugandan constitutional court ruling upholds a December 2017 constitutional amendment to remove the presidential age limit, likely allowing Museveni to rule for life. The article limited anyone from serving as president past the age of 75.

July 24, 2019 – Bobi Wine, a 37-year-old Ugandan pop star, announces he is running against Museveni, who has been in power for 33 years.

August 26, 2019 – A Harvard student sues Museveni for blocking him on Twitter arguing that being blocked has prevented him from giving feedback to the official’s account about government policies on Twitter.

April 9, 2020 – Museveni releases a home workout video in order to encourage Ugandans to stay home during the country’s coronavirus lockdown.

May 20, 2020 – The High Court in Kampala rules that Museveni and other officials have a right to block people on their private Twitter handles.

January 16, 2021 – Uganda’s election commission declares Museveni the winner of the presidential election. It is his sixth term in office.

May 12, 2021 – Museveni is sworn in for his sixth term as president.

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